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half slave and half free. >> casting nims the mold of the great civil rights leaders he avowed action on series of issue from climate change to immigration reform. became the first president to use the word "gay" in an inaugural address. >> our journey is not complete until our wives, mothers and daughters can earn a living equal to the efforts. our journey is not complete until our gay brothers and sisters are treated like anyone else under the law. >> debt and deficit front and center he offered a vigorous defense of entitlement programs. >> we must make the hard choices to reduce the cost of healthcare and size of the deficit. we reject that they must choose between caring that built the country. >> like every president since fdr, mr. obama started his day early, with a prayer service at st. john's church. before departing the white house for the longest motorcades known to man for the rise to the capital. a star-studded affair. where else do you see paul ryan mingling with jay-z and beyonce who belted out the national anthem. >> the ceremony was over there was a stream of pomp and
's right, shep. you heard the president citing both of them, talking a lot about civil rights and really casting himself as someone who wants to carry on their civil rights legacies. i think the broadered message of that what it means in the current political environment is he made very clear that he just didn't win the last election. he believes he has a mandate. he believes he is going to be very aggressive in the days ahead. he was talking about taking action on climate change, immigration reform and at a time when everyone in washington is talking about debt and deficits. he also gave a very rigorous defense of entitlement spending, take a listen. >> the commitments we make to each other through medicare and medicaid security, these things do not sap our initiative. they strengthen us. [ applause ] they do not make us a nation of takers. they free us to take the risks that make this country great. [ applause ] >> now, interesting as well that the white house put out a tweet about another part of the speech where he said, quote: our journey is not complete until our gay brothers and
is a collective biography of six african american civil rights lawyers who practice law during the era of segregation. it's about the collective struggles with civil rights and racial identities. it's about the fact that to be an african american civil rights lawyer in this era i argue in the book is to be caught between the black-and-white world. both blacks and whites want things. and identify with these particular lawyers. so to be as kind of a lawyer, thurgood marshall and people like him was to not just be an african-american lawyer. >> how difficult was it for an african american to become a lawyer during this time? >> is not difficult to become a lawyer. you have to go to law school like everybody else. it does cost money. but it is very difficult to succeed as a lawyer because no african-american lawyer is going to have white clients to more very few of them will have white clients. most black people don't have a lot of money. if you have money and you're black you hire a lawyer because, of course, when lawyers will be more effective in a segregated society. very difficult to s
. king worked with other civil rights lead towers bring the movement for equality not just for the south, but throughout the nation. >> i still have a dream. >> yes. >> it is deeply rooted in the american dream. >> mike: in 1963, dr. king brought the march to washington and announced his dream for all to hear. >> i have a dream that one day this nation will rise up and live out the true meaning of this creed. the children who will one day live in a nation where they will not be judged by the color of their skin, but by the content of their character. i have a dream today. >> mike: the power of those words forced washington to take action and a year later, the civil rights act of 1964 became law. making it illegal for federal and state governments to discriminate based on color, sex, or religion. dr. king's mission brought him to selma, alabama in 1965. he attempted to lead a march to the state's capitol, but mob and police violence forced them to stop. that day became known as bloody sunday. >> somewhere i read of the freedom of speech. somewhere i read of the freedom of press. somewhere
are honoring the civil rights leader played a significant role in advancing american rights, human rights for nonviolence in civil disobedience. until his assassination in 1968. thousands of people, the tributes started with a train ride. this was the annual fee o freedom train. he played a significant roleamerican rights through non-violence, and civil disobedience in the 19- sixties. until his for thousands of people here in the bay area, the tribute to doctor king began with a train ride today.. kron four's rob fladeboe was among those aboard the annual 'freedom train.' >> long live the dream. and long were the lines here at diridon station in san jose for caltrains annual holiday hundreds of people packed a pair of trains from san jose to san francisco on a bright clear morning with not one but two occasions to celebrate. for some, riding the freedom train has become an annual tradition. others rode for the first time. an on-going >> we listened to his speech of viagra tree might think it is pretty amazing. it is history. >> i do not know about everyone else but i did not realize ther
it not change with things like civil rights things like gay rights. what is it about this issue? >> reporter: well, one of the hard things since it's legalized, most people especially younger women have come to expect this is their right, they have the right to this care. we're not out there demanding something new but we're encouraging to keep the right we already have. so it's not quite the same for a struggle in guy rights or something new. for this generation it's maintain what we already have so you're not going to see as much enthusiasm. now people are seeing what can happen if you take for grants the right to have access to an abortion care and people are starting to push back. i'm optimistic about how we feel about this going forward. >> michael: that's a great answer to the question. that's exactly right. it's keeping it right rather than trying to get a new right. that makes a difference. it's also a big difference to keep news coverage of this alive all the time. thank you kate sheppard from mother jones magazine for coming on "the war room"." we have a progressive from a red stat
, making mentions of past civil rights struggles on that martin luther king day, seneca falls, selma, stonewall and laying out his vision for the future, advancing gay rights, tolerance toward illegal immigrants, social welfare programs and stopping climate change. dan loathian was there watching it all with us. dan, friend and foe alike have been calling this a muscular speech. >> reporter: it really was according to those who got a chance to witness the speech. the president delivering his remarks in a much more different climate than he faced four years ago when you had two wars, there was the economic crisis. this time, the president laid out a progressive agenda for the next four years. and so it began, the second inaugural ceremony of president obama, part campaign speech, part lecture, a confident president obama appeared comfortable in his skin. >> my fellow americans, we're made for this moment and we'll seize it as long as we seize it together. we, the people, declare today that the most evident of truths, that all of us are created equal >> our journey is not complete unti
, gay rights, civil rights. there was a feeling in the way he framed on that platform it felt different to her. it felt different to me. that was your reaction as well? >> it felt different to me as well. we're all sitting around whether we're journalists or not. we're listening for things. from our own experiences. so when i heard the president of the united states say stonewall after saying seneca falls and selma, sort of an electric shock went through me. whoa, the president of the united states just woef in the gay rights movement with the women's rights movement and the traditional civil rights movement, but he didn't just leave it there. that would have been box checking, but in the next paragraph he talked about our gay brothers and sisters and equal treatment under the law, and that went well beyond what i think anyone even expected a president of the united states to say in an inaugural address one of their premier platforms for the american president to not only talk to the american people, but to tack to the world. while this was a domestic address, a completely agree with th
the struggle for civil rights. >> for if we are truly created equal then surely the love we dmoyt one another must be equal as well. >>reporter: president insisting we address climate change and immigration arguing we should welcome striving immigrants. >> until bright young students and engineers are listed in our work force rather than expelled from our country there. were powerful performances. kelly clarkson stirring rendition of my country 'tis of thee. ♪ [ singing]. >>reporter: beyonce returning 4 years later this time to sing the national anthem. ♪ the rockets♪ the bombs bursting in air ♪ gave proof ♪ through the night ♪ that our flag was still there ♪ . >>reporter: as the president made his exit up those steps, a pause. turning around to take in his final inaugural moment one more time. microphone picking up what he said. >> about first couple made their way back to the white house, they emerge from the motorcade as they did 4 years ago. crowds cheering return home. first family taking in a parade. first couple with the kiss. the president moving to the
. [laughter] >> i was lucky enough to be there for all of them. >> the president spoke about selma, civil rights, seneca falls, stonewalled, where the modern gay rights movement was born. the couple of things happen. congress will have an impact on the administration. harry reid and mitch monnell of reaching an agreement on the filibuster, nothing profound, but that they will raise the debt ceiling to may 18. how will this impact the presidency? >> what the house did is a sign of what is ahead of us. they have not gone over the defeat from november. they have no leverage. they disvered theyave e leverage and now have to wait to back down. this is a face-saving device to kick it down the road until may. the president is in a much stronger position in dealing with the republicans in the house. >> do you agree with that? >> i always respect colby's opinion, but the president, like any reelected president, essentially, absent a national event where he becomes a dramatic figure, watches his popularity be rationed out day- by-day. he is strong now. it is hard to believe that he will be as stron
riots in new york city which launched the gay rights movement and linked them to other civil rights struggles. and now that the work is over as you saw a few minutes ago it is party time. coming up we'll get back and give you another insider's look at some of the festivities and preparations to make it happen. >>> the first time in 18 years the 49ers are back in the super bowl. if you were around here in the mid-'90s and 1980s, you know how wild the bay area gets with 49ers fever. this time something totally new for the 49ers and the nfl. you probably know by now, sibling rivalry, two brothers coaching against each other in the super bowl. we have extensive coverage tonight of the super bowl. jim kozemore in our newsroom. we begin with arturo santiago with the family angle. >> reporter: you could say john harbaugh has had bragging rights since they beat the 49ers on thanksgiving day in 2011. now that very same sibling rivalry will be played out on an even bigger stage, the super bowl. >> i feel like there's no losing in that family. and i'm sure the brothers feel the same way. but o
survive half slave and half free. >> casting himself in the mold of the great civil rights leader, vowed action on a series of issues from climate change to immigration reform and became the first president to use the word "gay" in the address. >> our gurn noi are not complete until wives, daughters, can earn a wage equal to their efforts. our journey is not complete until our gay brother and sisters are treated like anyone else under the law. >> he offered a bigger defense of entitlement programs. >> we must make the hard choices to reduce the cost of health care and the size of our deficit, but we reject the belief america has to choose between caring for the generation that built this country and investing in the generation that will build its future. >> like every president since fdr, mr. obama started it with a prayer service at st. johns church before departing the white house for one of the longest motorcades known to man for the ride to the capitol. ♪ oh beautiful >> a star-studded affair where else will paul ryan mingle with beyonce who belted out the national anthem. when the
. it is the right thing to do. in my view, this is a human rights issue of our times. like the civil rights issues of the 1960's. like the women's rights issues before it. it is of a fair and right thing to do is to pass comprehensive immigration reform, that provides a pathway to citizenship for individuals who are here, while also helping young people who were brought here at no fault of their own to be able to complete high school, going to college, serve in the military, and know that they can live and our country without fear of deportation. known as the dream act. and so, those are things that are very important to me. i know you said you are from texas. it is a very important issue. i will be serving on the homeland security committee and that committee has partial jurisdiction over immigration issues, particularly those pertaining to border security, ice, and customs, so we look forward to tackling that an upcoming session. host: representing nevada's fourth district as a democrat. tell us about the district it encompasses. guest: the nevada fourth district is the newest seat that we learn
: then the ceremonies got underway. the former chair of the naacp and widow of the slain civil rights leader delivered the invocation. >> we invoke the prayers of our grandmothers who taught us to pray, "god, make me a blessing." let their spirit guide us as we claim the spirit of old. there's something within me that holds the reins. there's something within me that banishes pain. there's something within me i cannot explain, but all i know, america, there is something within. there is something within. >> brown: perhaps the most rousing moment of the day came from the brooklyn tabernacle choir singing "battle hymn of the republic." ♪ his truth is marching on ♪ marching on >> brown: and then the first oath taking as supreme court justice sonia sotomayor the first of the president's two appointments to the court swore in the vice president. the musical moment changed when james taylor performed america the beautiful alone on his guitar. ♪ o, beautiful for spacious skies ♪ ♪ for amber waves of grain ♪ for purple mountains majesty ♪ ♪ above the fruited plains ♪ america, america >> brow
. >> absolutely. the civil rights movement created the possibility for barack obama to become president and i think he's ever mindful of that. i think that's where that community organizing comes in him. he knows that communities create the power. you think about the gay rights movement, the civil rights movement, the women's movement, this is all part of who he is and i think it's part of american history. when i look at american history, those movements are critical in transforming our attitudes about ourselves and about one another. and that's where real change takes place. lincoln said, you control public sentiment, controls everything. even if they can't control my voice. >> sometimes when historians try to speak too much in the course of one inaugural weekend, this is what happens. we're going to allow doris rest her voice for a second. you saw when we were talking a motorcade and you'd be forgiven for thinking there's the president on the move from the white house. it was not. first of all, you can't swing a dead cat without hit ago motorcade this weekend in washington. that was just t
's rights and civil rights. >> our journey isn't complete until our gay brothers andor t sisters are treated like anyone else under the law. (applause) righ for if we are truly created equal than surely the love we commit to one another must be equal as well. >> reporter: the president elevated man-made climate change higher than at any time since winning reelection, resurrecting an issue he's barely touched forly tou more than two years.n two ye >> some may still deny theill deny overwhelming judgment of science bu but none can avoid theg impact devastating impact of raging fires and crippling drought and more powerful storms.ith 11 mil >> reporter: with 11 million illegal immigrants in america,ngress to mr. obama called on congress topr provide a legal path tohip. citizenship. >> our journey is not complete until we find a better way to welcome the striving, hopeful immigrants who still see america as a land of opportunity. until bright young students and engineers are listed in our work force rather than expelled fromm our country. >> reporter: mr. obama also recalled the newtown shootin
and remembering martin luther king junior. the ceremonies today.. to honor the civil rights icon. join us for cbs 5 eyewitness news this morning... beginning >>> here's a look at today's forecast in some cities around the country. washington, big day there, we're looking at 42, possibility of rain or snow in the afternoon. atlanta, st. louis, and denver, lots of sunshine there. seattle, cloudy, though, with a high of 38. >>> there are new signs the housing market is rebounding. the commerce department reported last week that construction was up more than 12% last month. as carter evans reports, california is leading the boom. >> it's really pretty. >> yeah it's looking very good. >> reporter: erin and dino just bought their dream home. >> it felt like the economy was starting to turn and at the same time the interest rates were getting lower and lower. that created a sense urgency. >> reporter: they are hardly alone. here in east los angeles sales have tripped over the year. they're now selling homes faster than they can build them. >> this community is hopping. there's
in your "usa today" column as a difference between civil rights and civil liberties under this administration? guest: the inauguration speech was picking up a very common and almost mantra in the obama administration of achieving equality, which is a noble and important goal. i think the most significant thing about the inauguration speech, which are particularly thought was wonderful, was his reference to gay-rights and to the gay movement. it established his commitment to equality. i want to note that he has not been particularly aggressive in supporting gay rights in his first administration. his administration in court argued the same arguments as the bush administration. he still refuses to make clear his position on key legal aspects of gay-rights. and so, the first term obama was not nearly as passionate as that speech would suggest. but what was missing once again was a discussion of civil liberties. i think it does reflect this great schism in the democratic and liberal community. i wrote a column two years ago about how barack obama has destroyed the civil libert
" column as a difference between civil rights and civil liberties under this administration? guest: the inauguration speech was picking up a very common and almost mantra in the obama administration of achieving equality, which is a noble and important goal. i think the most significant thing about the inauguration speech, which are particularly thought was wonderful, was his reference to gay-rights and to the gay movement. it established his commitment to equality. i want to note that he has not been particularly aggressive in supporting gay rights in his first administration. his administration in court argued the same arguments as the bush administration. he still refuses to make clear his position on key legal aspects of gay-rights. and so, the first term obama was not nearly as passionate as that speech would suggest. but what was missing once again was a discussion of civil liberties. i think it does reflect this grewat this-- -- great schism in the democratic and liberal community. i wrote a column two years ago about how barack obama has destroyed the civil liberties movem
the civil rights float and a float paying tribute to dr. martin luther king. >> then you see the tuskegee air american float which pays tribute to the young african american soldiers which fought in world war ii, the first aviator military to fight in the war. >> these boys helped win the war and preserve our freedom that we have today. you know, i don't want people to forget that. >> reporter: along with the eight official floats there are 11 others commissioned by groups marching in the parade including nasa. look out for full size models of the curiosity mars rover and orion, the capsule that will take humans farther into space than ever before. >> the astronauts will be riding in that going on the next mission, so we have four, five or six astronauts that will be in the parade along with that. >> reporter: passers-by delighted to get up close with these works of art. patricia campbell says it helps teach her granddaughter about patriotism. >> the beauty of some of these floats is we can explain to her some of the things that our foreparents and those that have gone before us have d
in the first layperson to deliver an inaugural invocation. she is the widow of medgar evers, the civil-rights activist who was assassinated 50 years ago. >> 150 years after the emancipation proclamation and 50 years after the march on washington, we celebrate the spirit of our ancestors, which has allowed us to move from a nation of unborn hopes and history of disenfranchised folks to today's expiration of a more perfect union the a-expression of a more perfect union. we ask that where our paths seem blanketed by oppression and rippled by pangs of despair, we ask for your guidance toward the light of deliverance. and hose who came before us and dreamed of this day, that we recognize that their visions still inspire us. they are a great cloud of witnesses, unseen by the naked eye, but all around us, thankful that they're living was not in vain. for every mountain, you gave us the strength to climb, your grace is pleaded to continue that climb for america and the world. >> myrlie evers delivering the inaugural invocation. o misled, president of emmett if his inaugural address. >> week, the peop
. and then the third element was his expansion of civil rights where he talked about immigrants and gays and even shoehorned gun rights under the rubric of the security. he outlined the liberal agenda, the big-government agenda of the future. >>gretchen: i think there were two words that came out of it that summarized what charles was saying was that the president yesterday used these two words: collective action. if you parse those two words, it could bring you back to how he started in his career as a community organizer. >>steve: bob schieffer from cbs said there were no memorable lines in this speech. i think what is memorable is what his political director at cbs said in offering advice in a "slate" magazine column to the president. go for the throat of the g.o.p. listen. >> this article should scare anybody who has any doubts whatsoever about the media's impartiality. he is the news director, political director -- excuse me -- for cbs news. he writes a piece in which he calls for essentially an antidemocratic action. depoliticize the g.o.p. action. he believes obama at to delegitimize. it
, the issue of choice is, in fact, wrapped up with women's reproductive almost -- these are civil rights issues on a lot of levels. how is a transvaginal ultrasound not a violation of privacy. >> i think with michael, i would say to you, i have read what you say about this, i do believe that republican values are sort of -- have -- they've lost hold in the party in many ways, as a party of believing in individual rights, individual responsibilities, no government intrusion, except in this arena, and i think we can agree this is a deeply personal issue. it's one that should be made by women, their doctors, their families, and not by politicians. >> it becomes a little bit of a conflict when you argue for the right of individuals to make, you know, choices and then you start to limit those choices, which is the societial argument that you have. the question i have, to the point you just raised, alex, about how this generation as "the times" pointed out, are they diffusing the ultimate he message here, or conversation when they -- in the context of talking about reproductive routes or abort
an awful lot and passionately, and rightfully so, about rights, about civil rights. he didn't talk at all about civic responsibilities. and the thing i remember best about kennedy's speech is ask not what your country can do for you, but what you can do for your country. that's one of the things really missing in our country now and it's gone away over the last 15 years. we're trying to have democracy without citizenship. >> also had a chance to talk vermont senator bernie sanders at the american legions inaugural ball. he's the longest-serving independent in congressional history. he's also chair of the senate veterans affairs committee and he's talking about how concerned he is there are cuts to social program will hurt the military and families. i asked how does he plan to work with republicans to bring him closer to his side. >> i think republicans will be getting -- are beginning to catch on. they're beginning to understand the american people do not think that it makes sense to cut back on programs like social security, medicare, medicaid, veterans' needs and say, oh, yeah, we shoul
, in the speech the president also broke ground by promising to push for expanded civil rights for gays and lesbians. aside from his health care reform law, this could be the greatest legacy, the biggest legacy of his time in office. a case that is now before the supreme court could force the administration into making new federal policy on this front. it could force the administration to decide whether federal benefits will be extended to same-sex couples in the next year, wolf. >> so now that he's laid out very specifically -- i was surprised how specific he went yesterday in the inaugural address, his priorities for the second term, i assume in his state of the union address in february that he he will go into details with more specifics. is that what you're hearing? >> reporter: yes, wolf. i was not surprised that he laid out sign posts about where he wanted to make progress. what he wasn't going to do in this speech was get into detail. so where he laid out markers on these major issues, we will now hear much more policy detail in the state of the union and the white house is sayin
rights is of the same standing as the civil rights movement from selma to stonewall. wasn't president obama himself not in favor of gay marriage until six months ago? do you have to believe in same-sex marriage if you believe in the principles of the declaration of independence? i don't think so. i don't think most americans think that's just obviously the right thing to be for if you believe in the american declaration of independence and constitution. jon: always good to get your insights. bill kristol from "the weekly standard," thank you. arthel? arthel: we have a fox news extreme weather alert now as an arctic blast creates dangerous conditions across the country. police in ohio blaming sudden snow bursts for triggering a deadly chain reaction pile-up near cincinnati. one person died and at least 20 others were rushed to the hospital, some in critical condition. officers at the scene say there may have been 86 cars involved in that crash. while a separate crash in the same area damaged up to 50 more cars. the snow causing horrible conditions there, in new york as well, in our law
time ago. it was 1967. and i remember very well senator baker's story about how the civil rights bill in 1968 was passed. i discussed this with the republican leader before. he knows that era as well or better than i do. but there was a time when senator baker said he was in everett dirksen's office, the man who had the job senator mcconnell now has. he was the republican leader then. he said he heard the telephone ring and heard only one end of the conversation, but senator dirksen was saying, no, mr. president, i cannot come down and have a drink with you tonight. i did that last night and louella is very unhappy with me. and that was the conversation. about 30 minutes later there was a rustle out in the outer office, the office senator mcconnell holds, and two beagles came in and lyndon johnson, the president, said to the republican leader, everett, if you don't have a drink wh me, i'm down here to have one with you and the disperiod for 45 -- and they disappeared for 45 minutes. the point of that is it was in that very office, the republican leader's office in 1968, the next year
, as if that was -- he called it some sort of new, modern civil rights movement, which is kind of ridiculous. it really left a poor taste i think in a lot of people's mouths. jon: charlie hurt from the washington times. it's good to have you on. thank you, char here. >> thanks, jon. heather: coming up next secretary of state hillary clinton facing tough questions about the terror attack in benge, libya. but what more did we learn about the administration's response to the murder of ambassador christopher stevens and three other americans? we'll take a look. and golf star phil michelson says taxes in california, well they are so high he may have to leave. he's not a loan, though, thousands of californians are facing the possibility of losing mor more than half their income to the tax man. we'll take a look at why. (announcer) at scottrade, our clients trade and invest exactly how they want. with scottrade's online banking, i get one view of my bank and brokerage accounts with one login... to easily move my money when i need to. plus, when i call my local scottrade office, i can talk to someone who knows
. he equated the struggle for gay rights with the struggle for civil rights. >> our journey is not complete until our gay brothers and sisters are treated like anyone else under the law. >> reporter: at the luncheon which followed a more bipartisan tone. speaker of the house john boehner presented the president with a gift and good wish. >> in the spirit of harmony i'm proud to present the flag that flew over this battalion of democracy today to president barack obama and vice president joe biden, and to you gentlemen i say, congratulations, and godspeed. >> reporter: the most poignant picture of the day was this the president going inside from the west front of the capitol, pausing and turning for one last look down the vast expanse of the national mall. another thing he thought he might not see, some daylight on the debt limit fight. republicans said monday they would vote tomorrow to raise the debt limit for three months that delays at least for a while another showdown on the debt which could result in closing down the government. and in just three
accomplish a lot. >> absolutely. look at what eisenhower did. he dealt with little rock and civil rights. ike created nasa created anwar de demilitarized antarctica. and bill clinton, what would he have been without a second term. he's able to go around and talk about surplus because he had a second term. ronald reagan. i'm tire of hearing about iran-contra. diplomacy with gorbachev was a big deal. >> so you're not worried about the second term. >> not only am i not, the president can't be. >> make sure his team is focused the agenda and getting things >>> good morning. sun and clouds around today. it's going on a chilly one, but not as cold as four years ago. 34 now in town. 28 across the bay. good looking day today. inauguration day. sunshine, some clouds, breezy, chilly, some late afternoon flurries and snow >>> there's a record number of women in the new congress however, they are still far outnumbered by the men. we'll ask three female senators just why they think that is ahead on "cbs this morning" from washington. we'll be right back. thn this morning's "
creed. >> gretchen: as the rest rand and civil rights leader his words transformed a nation, after nearly 50 years of delivering his most famous speech, what would dr. king think about how we're handling race relations and other issues today. let's ask somebody who would know, alveda king is the niece of dr. martin luther king. and they've written a new book, mar lute king, jr., a king family tribute. what a beautiful book. >> good morning, and thank you so much. all of our family members have contributed to that book, remembering the martin luther king, jr. we knew and loved. and so, it's wonderful that you would even ask what would he be doing today. and he'd be doing the same thing that he was doing then. you know, he spoke with billy graham in madison square garden in his lifetime and he preached the bible and today the bible is front and center again, his bible and president lincoln's bible. so you have 150 years of the emancipation proclamation and 50 years of the dream and they're represented by those two bibles today. >> gretchen: it's so unbelievable it will be the bible f
whether it is leading efforts to enforce sanctions on iran, your work supporting women's rights around the world, engaging with civil society and restoring and maintaining american influence in a very difficult era. i would have thought your last hearing would be your chance to give us some advise for what to do over the next four years and beyond. i take seriously your strong advise because i lap to agree with it, it is about time we pass an authorization bill for both houses of congress. instead, we are here in our third hearing to deal with the tragic events this benghazi because it is a chance for each political party to beat up on the other. we can talk about how republicans didn't provide you with resources. we can talk about the administration inside the state department. i would hope maybe we can get you to come back again. i realize that would be gratis, you would not be on the government payroll and do the hearing i would like to have which is getting your input on the bigger issues of foreign policy. ultimately the security of our diplomats depends on the host country. this
supporting women's rights around the world and engaging with civil society and restoring and maintaining influence in a very difficult era. i would have thought that your last hearing would be a chance to give us advice for what to do-ovdo over the next four years and beyond. i take seriously your strong advice that it's about time we pass a reauthorization bill through both houses. instead we are here on i guess the third hearing to deal with the tragic events of benghazi because it's a chance to beat up on the other party. we can talk about how you were not provided with resources and the administration inside the state department. i hope that maybe we would get you to come back again. i realize that would be gratis. you wouldn't be on the payroll at that time. with the hearing i would like to have, getting your input on the bigger issues of foreign policy. ultimately the security of our diplomats depens on the host country. this is all a discussion about there might have been five security people on the ground if only there was more funning and deployment and that cable and this cable
their very own noncriminal data base of citizens here, but aware of the senstivities of civil liberties and say that america isn't ready culturally for that. and they added one key word to the sentence, yet. harris? >> all right. dom di-natale live from arizona. thank you. a houston texas waiter takes a stand against poor table manners and restaurant patrons get a taste of kindness after pretty mean remarks were said about a kid inside the restaurant and take a look, it's our nation's capitol the site of tom's presidential inauguration after today's private ceremony. private ceremony. fox's cov [ male announcer ] research suggests cell health plays a key role throughout our lives. one a day men's 50+ is a complete multivitamin designed for men's health concerns as we age. it has 7 antioxidants to support cell health. one a day men's 50+. nothing. are you stealing our daughter's school supplies and taking them to work? no, i was just looking for my stapler and my... this thing. i save money by using fedex ground and buy my own supplies. that's a great idea. i'm going to go... we got clie
here, but aware of the senstivities of civil liberties and say that america isn't ready culturally for that. and they added one key word to the sentence, yet. harris? >> all right. dom di-natale live from arizona. thank you. a houston texas waiter takes a stand against poor table manners and restaurant patrons get a taste of kindness after pretty mean remarks were said about a kid inside the restaurant and take a look, it's our nation's capitol the site of tom's presidential inauguration after today's private ceremony. fox's cov [ thunder crashes ] [ female announcer ] some people like to pretend a flood could never happen to them. and that their homeowners insurance protects them. [ thunder crashes ] it doesn't. stop pretending. only flood insurance covers floods. ♪ visit floodsmart.gov/pretend to learn your risk. sometimes life can be well, a little uncomfortable. but when it's hard or hurts to go to the bathroom, there's dulcolax stool softener. dulcolax stool softener doesn't make you go, it just makes it easier to go. dulcolax stool softener. make yourself comfortable. [ mal
'sritis around the world, en-- women's rights around the world, engaging in civil society and restoring and maintaining american influence in a very difficult era. and i would have thought that your last hearing would be your chance to give us some advice for what to do over the next conscious over the next four years and beyond. i take seriously your very strong advice because i happen to agree with it, that it's about time we pass an authorization bill through both houses of congress. but instead we're here at i guess our third hearing to deal with the tragic events in benghazi because it is a chance for each political party to beat up on the other. we can talk about how republicans didn't provide you with resources, we can talk about the administration inside the state department. so i would hope that maybe we'd get you to come back again. i realize that would be grats i, you wouldn't be on the government payroll at that time and do the hearing that i'd like to have. which is getting your input on the bigger issues of foreign policy. ultimately the security of our diplomats depend on
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